40 Hours of Television

The class is over, but the discussion continues. Does the media shape reality, or does reality shape the media? Art can imitate life...and life can imitate art. "40 Hours of TV" will explore the media and its impact on us all.

Thursday, December 22, 2005

Sorry For the Lack of Posts

If you're still with me, thank you. Life's been kind of hectic and my attention has been focused elsewhere. I just finished fall term at school, and I am also spending a lot of time at Blogcritics, where I am the assistant editor of the politics section. Which doesn't leave a lot of time for writing, I'm afraid.

But I have some time now, and wanted to talk about this new game show on NBC called Deal, or No Deal. Wow. I think I'm hooked. It's a very simple concept. There are 26 cases. Inside each case is a dollar amount ranging from .01 to $1,000,000. No one knows what is in each case. The contestant picks a case at random, and begins the process of elimination to see what his case contains. During various stages of the game, the "banker" will make an offer to the player to buy back their case, based on the odds that the player's case contains the highest amount of money. The banker's offer gets higher as the game progresses. Eventually the player will either take the banker's offer or keep going to see what is in their case. It could be a million dollars. Or only five dollars.

It's been playing all week, it's probably on tonight. Watch and be mesmerized by Howie Mandel's bald head.

1 Comments:

Blogger Paul said...

> But I have some time now, and wanted to talk about this new game show on NBC called Deal, or No Deal. Wow. I think I'm hooked.

I first saw this when I was visiting Spain, and I thought originally it was just another trashy European game show.

Endemol has now sold the format to Britain's Channel 4, broadcast on weekday afternoons at about 4pm, and it is a huge ratings winner for that slot. It has also reinvigorated the career of much-disliked former Saturday primetime host Noel Edmonds. As usual, the amounts which can be won in the British version are smaller than in the NBC version: the boxed prizes range from one penny to £250,000.

There's no skill involved, no questions, just pure psychology. It's not entirely to my taste, but I can see the attraction for some.

6:16 AM  

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